Secrecy & Leaks

Laura Poitras/Praxis Films / Ben Balter (background)

As long as there are governments, there will be government secrets—and there will also be leakers and whistleblowers. Recent high profile disclosures by Private Chelsea Manning and former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have renewed national discussion of the proper limits of American intelligence authorities and the proper limits of secrecy. They have reinvigorated also the debate over what tools prosecutors and agencies ought to use in identifying and prosecuting those who violate government confidences.

Latest in Secrecy & Leaks

Federal Law Enforcement

Documents: Statement of Offense and Plea Agreement for James Wolfe

In June, a grand jury in the District of Columbia indicted former Senate intelligence committee security director James Wolfe on three counts of making false statements to federal investigators. On Monday, Wolfe assented to a plea agreement with the Justice Department, pleading guilty to one of those counts.

Secrecy & Leaks

Document: Unsealed 1999 Special Master’s Report on Starr Investigation Leaks

At the order of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, the National Archives and Records Administration has unsealed the 1999 special master's report on possible leaks from the independent counsel's office in the Starr investigation. The report is available here and below.

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